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Enable antialiasing in 3DRAD games
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If you've played or made a game in 3DRad for any period of time, you will have noticed that the engine lacks any sort of filtering or anti-aliasing that can be applied internally. Sure you can use post-process effects on the camchase, but those can be quite resource-intensive and only apply to that game. This method I'm showing you is driver-level and as such needs either an NVIDIA or AMD graphics card (sorry Intel users, you're out of luck here).

The NVIDIA and AMD graphics drivers have a function available to force the usage of all kinds of effects including v-sync, anti aliasing and other settings that even include support for virtual reality.

APPLYING THE EFFECTS ON AN NVIDIA GPU
1. Open the 'NVIDIA Control Panel'. This can most often be accessed by right-clicking on the desktop and selecting it from the menu, or from the control panel.
2. Click the 'Manage 3D Settings' link in the sidebar.

3. Switch to the 'Program Settings' tab and click the 'Add' button. Browse to either your compiled 3DRad game or the 3DRad editor itself.

IF YOU ARE USING A LAPTOP THAT HAS SWITCHABLE GRAPHICS:
Change the 'Preferred Graphics Processor' to the 'High Performance NVIDIA processor'. This will allow you to change the settings that appear in the box below as well as enable hardware PhysX acceleration if it was running in software before.


4. In the 'Specify settings' box, scroll down and change the following settings:
- Anisotropic Filtering - 2x (adjust as you feel needed)
- Anti Aliasing FXAA - ON
- Anti Aliasing Transparency - 2x (adjust as you feel needed)
- Texture Filtering - Anisotropic sample optimisation - ON
- Texture Filtering - Negative LOD Bias - Allow
- Triple Buffering - ON (don't think it changes anything to be left off)

Now run the game or 3DRad and check that the jagged edges are reduced or even removed.  Check out the differences below

BEFORE


AFTER


Quite a bit of difference, making it look much nicer and what Unity3D can do

Depending on the settings, it can make the 2D elements look a little soft, so if that's the case, change them around a bit.

AMD coming soon
Created on: 3 years ago
Edited on: 3 years ago
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